Fish Amok in Cambodia

Today Mary and I took a Cambodian cooking class and learned how to make a delicious Khmer favorite: fish amok. Ever since we’ve arrived in Cambodia, I’ve been ordering fish amok everywhere, so I was happy to learn that I’d be learning how to cook this traditional meal myself.

Fish amok by yours truly

There are many different cooking classes offered throughout the city. I advise you research online or ask a local concierge to decide which cooking class would be best for you. Our cooking class was through the Frizz Restaurant (Frizz Cooking Class). It’s $15 for a half day’s lesson, and a full day is $23. Our cooking instructor was quite humorous and very knowledgeable – he used to cook for the Cambodian king! This was the perfect addition to our one and only day in Phnom Penh. We also made new American friends!
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Coincidentally in ascending order: Mary, me, Madeline, and Rich

Below are some pictures of the different fish amoks I’ve tasted around Cambodia:

Place: Linda’s Restaurant
Location: Angkor Thom, Siem Reap
Order: Fish Amok
Price: 6 RM

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Place: Angkor Night Market Food Court (Food stall next to Island Bar)
Location: Angkor Night Market, Siem Reap
The night market is located just off Sivatha Blvd, around 10 minute walk from Old Market or Center Market.
Order: Fish Amok
Price: 3 RM

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Place: King Fy Restaurant
Location: #306, St.155, Romchek4, Ratanak, Battambang, Cambodia
Order: Fish Amok
Price: 5.50 RM

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Place: Blue Lime Poolside Bar and Restaurant
Location: 19Z, off of 19th Street, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Order: Fish Amok
Price: 5.50 RM

Food notes: Fish amok is a very popular Khmer or Cambodian dish and can be found on almost any menu throughout the country. Although various cities or provinces may make amok slightly differently, my opinion is that the dish is simply delicious. It is a variation of the casual curry you may be accustomed to: the base of the amok sauce is a curry paste which usually includes turmeric, red chili, garlic, galangal, etc. However, the special notes in amok are the coconut milk, lemongrass, and palm sugar that harmonizes with the saltiness and heat. Amok is traditionally cooked with fish, but any other kind of meat can be easily substituted. I love fish amok because the fish is steamed in the sauce, and I think this cooks the fish to perfection! My favorite amok in Cambodia was at the Angkor Night Market food court. The sauce was the right consistency, the spices were well balanced, and the fish was well cooked and generous.

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